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to a better tomorrow

What not to do in estate planning

On Behalf of | Nov 16, 2021 | Estate Planning & Wills

Estate planning and wills in Virginia give you the means of transferring your estate without conflict. The proper administration of assets is a real challenge that an estate owner is left with after their death. As simple as it might initially seem, your belongings don’t exactly fall to your closest relative when you die. You must set up directives that manage your assets in the event of your death, and here are some mistakes to avoid along the way.

Waiting too long to start

Estate planning and wills seem like projects for the elderly, but they can be legally set up for adults 18 and older. In fact, the sooner you plan, the more options you’ll have for using an estate to build wealth. Time is key, for the sooner it’s started, the more a plan can be improved.

Small yet major errors

A will is delicate in that what it contains will get scrutinized within a necessary court hearing. During the public examination of your will, a simple typo could render many of your wishes as invalid. Without you being there to address such errors, your assets are at risk of loss.

Not being specific about beneficiaries

Estate planning and wills both consist of beneficiaries who will receive the assets of your estate. Choosing your beneficiaries isn’t as simple as having children and listing them. Some of your kids are more financially educated. Others have disabilities that have to be taken into consideration.

Estate planning and wills in Virginia

As you plan and prepare an estate, include a plan for handling its future tax liability. Failing to understand taxes will lead to your heirs paying more than they might otherwise have to.

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