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Important aspects of a co-parenting plan

On Behalf of | May 15, 2022 | Child Custody and Visitation

Even though a parenting plan can be a useful tool for divorced families, a solid plan won’t anticipate every future disagreement. However, the parenting plan can provide guidelines for resolving conflicts and helping children adjust to a new routine. If you’re a Virginia resident, here are some important things you should know about creating a workable child custody plan.

What does a parenting plan entail?

A child custody plan includes a schedule that will detail your child’s routine activities. The plan will spell the tasks each parent is expected to complete when they are on or off “duty.” The directives in the parenting plan outline a schedule based on the needs and ages of the children, as well as the parents’ work schedule.

Parents may also want to include visitation rules for holidays, summer vacations, and children’s birthdays. Some families may also want to discuss which holiday or cultural traditions they will continue to observe with one another after the divorce.

Additional factors to consider

Within the child custody plan, parents can decide who will speak on behalf of the children when it comes to healthcare and which religion the children will be raised in. Parents can also use the co-parenting plan to decide which extracurricular activities the children can participate in and whether they can attend certain social gatherings such as parties or sleepovers.

Parents can also use the plan to decide how conflicts or disagreements will be handled. If the parents can’t agree on how to handle a child-related issue, they can schedule a meeting with each other and/or a therapist. Parents can also include their children in the conversation if the children are old enough to express their needs.

 

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